Tags

Items found matching the tag "pleasant"

Cascade

Cascade was released in 1972 by the USDA in Oregen, it is named for the Northwest mountain range. Primarily developed at Oregon State University East Farm in Corvallis. Cascade is a cross between Fuggle and Serebrianka (Russia) and open pollinated in 1955. Cascade is the first superstar of American hops and paved the way for bold hops in today's brewing scene. The ratio of alpha to beta acids is similar to European aroma hops.

Early Prolific

Early Prolific has an unknown breeding. It is assumed that it was from a mass selection at Wye College, England. May be useful for breeding of aroma hops but no longer grown commercially due to poor growth and yield (similar to Early Promise in this regard).

Early Promise

Early Promise has an unknown breeding. It is assumed that it was from a mass selection at Wye College, England. May be useful for breeding of aroma hops but no longer grown commercially due to poor growth and yield (similar to Early Prolific in this regard).

Eastern Green

Eastern Green was bred from Toyomidori and open pollination in Japan by Dr. Atsushi Murakamin, of the Kirin Brewery Hop Research Center in Iwate, Japan, in the mid 1980s. Has high yield and growth but it is unknown if it is grown commercially.

Nordgaard

Nordgaard, an Belgian (possibly Danish) land race variety, is no longer grown commercially. It was used in the 1970s for breeding purposes by Dr. Tone Wagner at Zalec, Slovenia.

Tolhurst

Tolhurst was bred by James Tolhurst of Horsmonden, England in the 1880s. No longer grown commercially, it has a high farnesene content but has low yields, poor storage and growth.

Universal

Universal has an unknown heritage but it expected to be a Saaz clone. Developed at the Hop Research Institute in Zatec, Czechoslovakia. No longer grown commercially in Czechoslovakia but grown in the United States since 1988, becoming a darling on the craft beer since since the 1990s.

Wuerttemberger

Wuerttemberger is a German hop that is possibly related to Saaz and Tettnanger. It is no longer grown commercially.

Did you know?
  • Dwarf variety hops grow shorter in height than traditional varieties but, importantly, produce the same yield. This combination makes harvest easier.
Explanations
  • Storage: is based on the percentage of alpha acids remaining after 6 months at 20*F.
  • Oil composition percetages are based on the total percentage of oil in the hop. Example: 10 - 20% means that for the specific oil it is 10 - 20% of the overall oil make up.
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