Tags

Items found matching the tag "aroma and bittering"

Bitter Gold

Bitter Gold was released in 1999 and has lineage linked to Brewer's Gold, Bullion, Comet and Fuggle. Higher alpha acids than any of its parents as well as when compared to Galena or Nugget, which are considered close substitutes. Mild profile when used as a bittering addition but shines in later additions, delivering stone and tropic fruit flavors.

Bramling Cross

Developed and bred at Wye College by Professor Salmon, Bramling Cross is a cross between Bramling and Manitoban (a wild Canadian hop). It was released in 1951. Referred to as an English hop with an American aroma. Large quantities brings out the fruitiness in the Bramling Cross.

Centennial

Released in 1990, Centennial's genetics is 75% Brewer's Gold as well as Fuggle, East Kent Golding, and Bavarian hops. The male parent is the same as that of Nugget. Typically referred to as "Super Cascade". Centennial offers more bittering potential and an overall bigger profile than Cascade. Centennial was developed in 1974 by S.T. Kenny and C.E. Zimmerman. Bred by the United States Department of Agriculture Hop Germplasm Collection, Oregon State Univerity East Farm Washington State University Irrigated Agriculture Research and Extension Center, Prosser, Washington.

Chinook

Released by the United States Department of Agriculture breeding program in 1985, Chinook is considered by the some the fourth member of the Three C's: Cascade, Centennial, and Columbus. With no trademark, Chinook is a great candidate to grow at home.

Hallertauer Taurus

Hallertauer Taurus was bred in Hüll, Germany and released in 1995 at the Hop Research Center. This is a high alpha acid variety with a clean and crisp bitterness.

Horizon

Horizon contains the lowest cohumulone level of any hop, which typically results in a smoother bitterness. Horizon is a half-sister of Nugget, bred at Oregon Status University in Corvallis, Oregon by United States Department of Agriculture in 1970 with eventual commercial release in 1998, has lineage of Brewer's Gold, Early Green Hops, USDA 65009 and 64035M. USDA 65009 was also the mother of Nugget.

Idaho Gem

Idaho Gem was bred at Gooding Farms in Wilder, Idaho and named after its home state. The flavors from Idaho Gem are soft and full with remarkable smoothness.

Merkur

Merkur is a descendant of Magnum, making it a great bittering hop. The lower co-humulone level makes it an even smoother bitterness. Dual purpose as it also adds a nice aroma profile. Merkur was developed at the Hop Research Institute in Hüll, Germany.

Motueka

Motueka was bred by New Zealand's Plant & Food Research, a triploid descendant of Saaz. A great dual purpose hop.

Northern Brewer

Developed and bred at Wye College, Northern Brewer was released in 1934. Of Brewer's Gold and East Kent Golding lineage, in spite of originally being an English hop, it is now mostly grown in Germany and the United States.

Northern Brewer (GR)

Norther Brewer (GR) is the same hop grown in England. The growing conditions in Germany make the hop slightly varied in profile.

Northern Brewer (US)

Norther Brewer is a great bittering hop that is the base of many beer. It is a cross of a Native American varietal and Northern Brewer, the resulting hop is genetically distinct from the English parent.

Nugget

Nugget was bred by the United States Department of Agriculture in Corvallis, Oregon, starting in 1970.. Initial commercial release was 1983. Brewer's Gold heritage. Used primarily as a bittering hop, especially in the early days, but now has been given dual duty as an aroma hop as well. Pedigree is quite complex and makes it a mutt: Brewer's Gold, Early Green, East Kent Golding, Bavarian (unspecified) and unknown variety.

Olympic

Olympic is bred from Brewer's Gold, Fuggle, East Kent Golding, Bavarian, and a fifth unknown varietal. It was released sometime in the mid 1980s.

Opal

Opal was bred by Hüll Hop Research Institute in 2001, released commercially in 2004. The hop has not been well received the commercial breweries.

Pacific Gem

Pacific Gem was commercially released in 1987, it is a triploid of Fuggle, Cluster, and Smooth Cone. It was bred at New Zealand's HortResearch Institute.

Perle (US)

The same as the German Perle but with a higher alpha content.

Phoenix

Phoenix is a high alpha varietal that performs well early in the boil. Bred at Wye College in Kent, England, it is an offspring of Yeoman. A replacement to Challenger as is more resistant to disease. Phoenix is considered a dual hop but typically used early in the boil for its clean bittering qualities. As a late addition it tends to be disappointing as it is mellow.

Pilgrim

Bred at Wye College in Kent, England, with parents of First Gold and Herald. Pilgrim was released commercially in 2001. It is one of the most wilt resistant hops out today.

Pioneer

Bred at Wye College in Kent, England in 1984, released commercially in 1996. Pioneer is a dual purpose hop.

Progress

Another hop developed by the United Kingdom's Wye College by the Horticulture Research International, Progress was created to replace Fuggle. Less susceptible to Wilt disease (the issue with Fuggle), Progress proved to be susceptible to other diseases. Bred in 1951 from Whitebread Golding female and US male. Commercially released in 1964.

Rakau

Rakau was re-released in 2007 by the New Zealand Hop Breeding Program. Considered to have "the whole orchard" by the breeder. Orginally bred in the 70s it was not released until 1983. The myrcene oil content concentration leads to the aforementioned huge orchard profile while low cohumulone make it less bitter. Lineage of Smooth Cone.

Sasquatch®

Sasquatch® is the first trademarked hop from Canada, grown commercially in British Columbia, by Hops Connect. Based on the type of hop that Sasquatch® is paired with will bring out different aspects of the profile.

Simcoe®

Simcoe® is a very popular variety due to the profile of the hop and the smooth bitterness it creates. It plays well with other hops. Simcoe® was released through Yakima Chief Ranches in 2000. Sometimes referred to as "Cascade on steroids".

Sterling

Sterling was bred by United States Department of Agriculture in 1990, released in 1998. Sterling is typically considered an aroma hop but may be used for bittering. It was cultivated to be a replacement for Saaz due to unreliable availability. The hop is a bit of a mutt (or you could say complex) with heritage from Saaz (50%), Cascade (25%), Brewer's Gold, Early Green as well as other Eurpean varieties.

Sticklebract

Sticklebract was bred in New Zealand, by the DSIR Research Station, to help fight Black Root Rot that had affected the hops in the 1960s. It was released in 1972. A versatile hop.

Styrian Aurora

Styrian Aurora is a diploid that is a cross between Northern Brewer and a Yugoslavian male. It was bred in the 1970s by the Hop Research Institute. An early maturer, Styrian Aurora is typically ready for harvest in late August.

Summit

Summit is a semi-dwarf, bred from Zeus, Nugget and gaggle of males in Washington, USA, making the lineage complex. Released in 2003 by American Dwarf Hop Association. Super high alpha acid content makes this hop great for bittering. Aromatics star when used as a dry hop.

Sylva

Saaz lineage grant Sylva perfect suitability for lagers and pilsners. Bred in 1997 by Hop Products Australia.

Target

Target was bred in the 70s, released to the public in 1992 by Wye College. The hop has lineage of Northern Brewer and Eastwell Goldings and related to Challenger. Has become a widely grown hop. Typically used to add aroma to English ale and lagers.

Tettnanger

Tettnanger, named for the town in Germany that it was developed: Tettnang around 1844. Evidence can be found that it goes all the way back to 1150. Appropriate for any German style beer. There are US, Australian and Swiss versions of this hop that are somewhat different.

Tettnanger (US)

This is the US version of German Tettnanger that came from a Swiss cultivar. Likened more to Saaz then Tettnanger.

Did you know?
  • Dwarf variety hops grow shorter in height than traditional varieties but, importantly, produce the same yield. This combination makes harvest easier.
Explanations
  • Storage: is based on the percentage of alpha acids remaining after 6 months at 20*F.
  • Oil composition percetages are based on the total percentage of oil in the hop. Example: 10 - 20% means that for the specific oil it is 10 - 20% of the overall oil make up.
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