Tags

Items found matching the tag "spice"

Aramis

Aramis is the first variety from the Comptoir Agricole breeding program in France, bred in 2002. Aramis comes from a breed of Strisselspalt and Whitebread Golding. It was bred to create Strisselspalt character hop with increased and stable bitter potential.

Bramling Cross

Developed and bred at Wye College by Professor Salmon, Bramling Cross is a cross between Bramling and Manitoban (a wild Canadian hop). It was released in 1951. Referred to as an English hop with an American aroma. Large quantities brings out the fruitiness in the Bramling Cross.

Hallertau

Hallertau has lineage back over 100 years. Great for German beers as well as Belgian ales. An original noble hop. Susceptible to disease, it has been the center of many offspring.

Hallertauer Taurus

Hallertauer Taurus was bred in Hüll, Germany and released in 1995 at the Hop Research Center. This is a high alpha acid variety with a clean and crisp bitterness.

Hallertauer Tradition

Hallertauer Tradition is a German hop that is great for German style beers. Originally bred because of it's resistance to disease at the Hüll Hop Research Institute in Germany in 1993. Heritage of Hallertau, Saaz and unknown varieties.

Hokitika®

Hokitika® is of European origin but was first grown in New Zealand in 1882. The hop originated from a hop garden that was started in the 1880's by the brewery principal, WCJ Kortegast, at Kortegast's Brewery at Gibson Quay, on the Hokitika River. Those gardens had been growing wildly for 136 years.

Northdown

Northdown was bred at Wye College in Kent, England as higher alpha acid alternative to the hops of the time (1970s). A result of breeding Northern Brewer and an unknown German varietal.

Pacifica

Pacifica has German lineage. Bred by HortResearch in New Zealand it was released commercially in 1994. Open breeding of Hallertau and is mostly known for its aroma qualities.

Record

Record originated in Belgium pre-1970, it was bred from open pollination of Northern Brewer and Saaz. Aroma characteristics are similar to Northern Brewer. Hop is grown commercially in Belgium and Germany.

Saaz (US)

United States version of Saaz was started from a Czechoslovakian Saaz seedling which was received by United States Department of Agriculture in 1973. Difficult to grow and a low yield. Saaz (US) is expected to be related to Hersbrucker and Spalt.

Saphir

Saphir contains one of the lowest alpha acid contents in the world, therefore it is always used as an aroma hop. A German release in 2000 it contains a fruity profile, unlike many German hop varietals. Saphir was bred at the Hop Research Center in Hüll, Germany. Similar to much of the hop breeding in Germany it was sought as a substitute to Hallertau to be more disease resistant.

Spalt

Grown in the Spalt region of Germany, Spalt is a natural hop and has a mild and pleasant character. Part of the Saaz family. A classic hop for German style beers. Due to Spalt being a natural hop, this hop may date back as far back as 8th century. It was the first hop granted the German hop seal in the 16th century.

Spalter Select

Spalter Select is a more disease resistant version and replacement for Spalt released in 1993. It was bred in Hull, Germany and is a cross between Splat and Hallertau. Spalter Select was released in 1991 by the Hop Research Center of Hull.

Sterling

Sterling was bred by United States Department of Agriculture in 1990, released in 1998. Sterling is typically considered an aroma hop but may be used for bittering. It was cultivated to be a replacement for Saaz due to unreliable availability. The hop is a bit of a mutt (or you could say complex) with heritage from Saaz (50%), Cascade (25%), Brewer's Gold, Early Green as well as other Eurpean varieties.

Styrian Aurora

Styrian Aurora is a diploid that is a cross between Northern Brewer and a Yugoslavian male. It was bred in the 1970s by the Hop Research Institute. An early maturer, Styrian Aurora is typically ready for harvest in late August.

Summit

Summit is a semi-dwarf, bred from Zeus, Nugget and gaggle of males in Washington, USA, making the lineage complex. Released in 2003 by American Dwarf Hop Association. Super high alpha acid content makes this hop great for bittering. Aromatics star when used as a dry hop.

Target

Target was bred in the 70s, released to the public in 1992 by Wye College. The hop has lineage of Northern Brewer and Eastwell Goldings and related to Challenger. Has become a widely grown hop. Typically used to add aroma to English ale and lagers.

Tettnanger

Tettnanger, named for the town in Germany that it was developed: Tettnang around 1844. Evidence can be found that it goes all the way back to 1150. Appropriate for any German style beer. There are US, Australian and Swiss versions of this hop that are somewhat different.

Tettnanger (US)

This is the US version of German Tettnanger that came from a Swiss cultivar. Likened more to Saaz then Tettnanger.

Tropadelic®

Tropadelic® was bred by Wild About Hops in New Zealand. A profile of citrus and tropical fruits accompanied with low alpha acids make it great for late aroma additions.

Universal

Universal has an unknown heritage but it expected to be a Saaz clone. Developed at the Hop Research Institute in Zatec, Czechoslovakia. No longer grown commercially in Czechoslovakia but grown in the United States since 1988, becoming a darling on the craft beer since since the 1990s.

Vanguard

Vanguard is an American bred hop that was the last of the Hallertau based hops from the United States Department of Agriculture. Originally bred in 1982 and released in 1997. The hop is unique in that it has a low alpha acid but a high beta acid. The unusual oil balance yields a pronounced woody and herbal character. In early additions considered to be very spicy.

Warrior®

Warrior® is a high alpha variety with a ridiculously smooth bitterness. Developed by Yakima Chief Ranches, arising from the same program that created Simcoe®.

Willamette

Willamette is a Fuggle (Tetraploid Fuggle (USDA 21003) x Fuggle seedling 2-4) derived hop released in 1976 by the United States Department of Agriculture, initially bred in 1967. It's name is derived from the important growing region in Oregon: the Willamette Valley, which has been growing hops since the 1850s.

Did you know?
  • Dwarf variety hops grow shorter in height than traditional varieties but, importantly, produce the same yield. This combination makes harvest easier.
Explanations
  • Storage: is based on the percentage of alpha acids remaining after 6 months at 20*F.
  • Oil composition percetages are based on the total percentage of oil in the hop. Example: 10 - 20% means that for the specific oil it is 10 - 20% of the overall oil make up.
Useful Links